Simeon Lewis Carson (1882-1954)

Dr. Simeon Lewis Carson, a late-19th and early-20th century black physician, would be most known for being one of the first surgeons within Washington, D.C. to use spinal anesthesia during surgery. However, he is also renowned for his skillful use of general anesthesia throughout most of the surgeries … Read MoreSimeon Lewis Carson (1882-1954)

The Harlem Renaissance in the American West

In the following article historians Bruce Glasrud and Cary Wintz discuss their new book, The Harlem Renaissance in the American West which argues that the literary and artistic outpouring by African Americans during the third decade of the 20th Century was a national phenomenon which … Read MoreThe Harlem Renaissance in the American West

Eileen Jackson Southern (1920-2002)

Eileen Southern was among the first generation of musicologists focused on studying, preserving, and teaching the history and traditions of African American music. She was also the first female African American faculty member at Harvard University. Born Eileen Jackson in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 1920, her … Read MoreEileen Jackson Southern (1920-2002)

Juneteenth: The Growth of an African American Holiday (1865- )

The Juneteenth Minidoc In the article below, historian Quintard Taylor describes the origins and evolution of the Juneteenth holiday sine 1865.   Any bright high schooler or Constitutional law expert would say that African Americans were formally liberated when the Georgia legislature ratified the 13th Amendment on December 6, … Read MoreJuneteenth: The Growth of an African American Holiday (1865- )

The Myth of the Buffalo Soldiers

Nineteenth Century African American soldiers who served in the Western United States have generally been known a “Buffalo Soldiers.”  In this article, however, military historian Frank N. Schubert, challenges modern popular perceptions of the soldiers, among them the significance of their name and the nature … Read MoreThe Myth of the Buffalo Soldiers