Independent Historian

Quinton McDonald is an author/ entrepreneur from Little Rock, Arkansas.  He has a degree in Business from the University of Maryland.  As a self-published author, he currently has a children’s book for young girls of color titled Yes, you are beautiful too!. Its purpose is to promote more positive self-esteem in a society that praises certain “looks” more than others. He also has a children’s book for young boys of color, Dad, can I ask you a question? which promotes the notion that “you can accomplish anything you put your mind to regardless of circumstances.”

As an advocate for the power of positive thought, McDonald has had the opportunity to speak to multiple youth groups through community organizations and public schools.  His third book, 4 Children, 3 Baby Mommas, 2 Divorces Later…: What I learned from failing in my Relationships, addresses improving the quality of relationships. He takes his own experience and lessons learned and openly shares them to help others where they may need it. Because of this he has been invited to speak in several forums about common relationship issues and ways to overcome them.  Lastly, Quinton has been a member of the United States Navy for over 12 years and has served the country around the world.  Through all, his primary mission is to contribute to the improvement of the lives of people of color, especially the youth.

The Negro Baseball Leagues (1920-1950)

The first recorded game of baseball in America occurred on June 19, 1846 in Hoboken, New Jersey. In its first two decades the sport was racially integrated but after the Civil War, African American baseball players were banned from the National Association of Amateur Baseball … Read MoreThe Negro Baseball Leagues (1920-1950)

Charles Mitchell, Slavery, and Washington Territory in 1860 [Children’s Edition]

This entry is for juvenile audiences. To see the full version of this entry, click here. Who are they: Charles Mitchell was born into slavery in 1847 on the Marengo Plantation in Maryland. He was born to a free white man, also named Charles Mitchell, … Read MoreCharles Mitchell, Slavery, and Washington Territory in 1860 [Children’s Edition]

The Birmingham Children’s Crusade (May 1963) [Children’s Edition]

This entry is for juvenile audiences. To see the full version of this entry, click here. What Happened: In May of 1963, thousands of Black children ages 7-18, conducted peaceful protests around the city of Birmingham, Alabama. They were organized by activist James Bevel, and … Read MoreThe Birmingham Children’s Crusade (May 1963) [Children’s Edition]

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) [Children’s Edition]

This entry is for juvenile audiences. To see the full version of this entry, click here. What happened: HBCUs were founded in response to the need for people of color to have more access to education programs. The earliest HBCUs were founded between 1837 and … Read MoreHistorically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) [Children’s Edition]

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) (1837- )

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are institutions established before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to provide post-secondary (high school) education to Black people. In the immediate post-Civil War period when only two predominantly white colleges, Oberlin (Ohio) and Berea (Kentucky), accepted black students, … Read MoreHistorically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) (1837- )

Raphael G. Warnock (1969- ) [Children’s Edition]

This entry is for juvenile audiences. To see the full version of this entry, click here. Who are they: U.S. Senator Raphael G. Warnock was born July 23, 1969, in Savannah, Georgia. He had 11 brothers and sisters, and they lived in a housing project … Read MoreRaphael G. Warnock (1969- ) [Children’s Edition]