America’s Black Ambassadors: A Historical Snapshot

In the article below, Carlton McLellan, PhD, a senior fellow at the Association for Diplomatic Studies and Training (ADST), briefly describes the history of the more than one hundred and forty black women and men who have led diplomatic delegations as U.S. Ambassadors in ninety-five … Read MoreAmerica’s Black Ambassadors: A Historical Snapshot

Jendayi E. Frazer (1961- )

“Image Ownership: Public Domain” Ambassador Jendayi E. Frazer is currently on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania.  She has been there since 2009 as the university’s Distinguished Public service Professor in the Heinz College School of Public Policy and Management.  Frazer is also … Read MoreJendayi E. Frazer (1961- )

W. Beverly Carter (1921-1982)

William Beverly Carter at Lincoln University, 1943 Ambassador William Beverly Carter is the first Ambassador-at-Large, and the second African American, to be appointed an ambassador by three Presidents. In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon appointed him ambassador to Tanzania. Four years later, President Gerald R. … Read MoreW. Beverly Carter (1921-1982)

African Cowboys on the Argentine Pampas: Their Disappearance from the Historical Record

Following the introduction of cattle into the Caribbean in 1493, during Christopher Columbus’s second voyage, cattle ranching proliferated along a series of frontiers across the grasslands of North and South America. While historians have recognized that Africans and their descendants were involved in the establishment … Read MoreAfrican Cowboys on the Argentine Pampas: Their Disappearance from the Historical Record

Josef Kony (1961?- )/Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA)

“Image Ownership: Public Domain” Josef Kony, the leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), was reportedly born in 1961 and raised in the northern Uganda village of Odek.  Kony was deeply influenced as a youth by Christianity.  Following the arrival of the first missionaries in … Read MoreJosef Kony (1961?- )/Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA)

(1960) Patrice Lumumba, “National Radio Address”

The political situation in the Congo deteriorated rapidly after it gained independence on June 30, 1960.  By July Belgian paratroopers had arrived in Stanleyville, the capital of Katanga province, attacking the Congolese army and police in a bid to aid the province in resisting the … Read More(1960) Patrice Lumumba, “National Radio Address”