The Crusader (1918-1922)

The Crusader was a black communist magazine established by journalist Cyril Briggs initially with the financial support of West Indian merchant Anthony Crawford in September 1918.  Briggs established The Crusader in response to and in support of President Woodrow Wilson’s Fourteen Points that called for the “impartial adjustment of all colonial claims.”  Briggs, formerly of the Amsterdam … Read MoreThe Crusader (1918-1922)

The Symbionese Liberation Army (1973–1975)

The Symbionese Liberation Army Self-Portrait, 1973 “Image Ownership: Public Domain” Coming from the biological term symbiosis, meaning the interdependence of different species, the Symbionese Liberation Army was a radical leftist revolutionary organization that sought to unify all left-wing struggles under one banner. The Berkeley, California-formed … Read MoreThe Symbionese Liberation Army (1973–1975)

Walter Charles Carrington (1930 – )

“Image Ownership: Public Domain” Walter Charles Carrington served as the United States Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to Senegal from 1980 to 1981, and to Nigeria from 1993 to 1997. He married Arese Ukpoma, a Nigerian physician, and has lived in three Nigerian cities since the … Read MoreWalter Charles Carrington (1930 – )

People’s Baptist Church, Portsmouth, New Hampshire (1873- )

“Image Ownership: Public Domain” People’s Baptist Church in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, thrived for the first half of the 20th century as the state’s first and only black congregation.  It served a New England coastal community where African Americans represented 4% of the population.  People’s Baptist … Read MorePeople’s Baptist Church, Portsmouth, New Hampshire (1873- )

Samuel Younge (“Sammy”) Leamon, Jr. (1944-1966)

“Image Ownership: Public Domain” Samuel (“Sammy”) Leamon Younge Jr. was a young civil rights activist who was shot to death on January 3, 1966 when he attempted to use a whites-only restroom at a gas station in Macon County, Alabama. He was 21 years old.  … Read MoreSamuel Younge (“Sammy”) Leamon, Jr. (1944-1966)

George W. Lowther (1822-1898)

Image Ownership: Public Domain George W. Lowther, barber, abolitionist, equal school rights activist, and Massachusetts legislator, was born a slave in Edenton, North Carolina, to Polly Lowther.  His father’s identity is unknown.  His mother, Polly Lowther (c.1780-1864) was an Edenton baker, the slave of wealthy … Read MoreGeorge W. Lowther (1822-1898)

Garveyism Looks Toward the Pacific: The UNIA and Black Workers in the American West

In the article below historian Robin Dearmon Muhammad discusses the growth of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) or the Garvey Movement in the American West, with particular emphasis on its influence in black working-class organizing in the San Francisco Bay Area after World War … Read MoreGarveyism Looks Toward the Pacific: The UNIA and Black Workers in the American West