Julius Winfield Robertson (1916-1961)

Civil rights attorney Julius W. (Robinson) Robertson was born on July 23, 1916, to parents Richard Robinson and Fannie Mae Robinson, who were subsistence farmers in Green County, Georgia. In 1922, the family moved to Knoxville, Tennessee for better opportunities. Robertson joined the Civilian Conservation … Read MoreJulius Winfield Robertson (1916-1961)

Charles Henry Turner (1867-1923)

A prolific scholar and passionate educator, Dr. Charles Henry Turner made significant contributions to the fields of zoology, entomology, and psychology. Over a thirty-year career, he published widely on not only scientific topics, but also civil rights and education, authoring over seventy articles in total. … Read MoreCharles Henry Turner (1867-1923)

Free Colored Library, Knoxville, Tennessee (1918-1961)

The Free Colored Library of Knoxville, Tennessee was a segregated public library that opened in 1918 and closed 43 years later in 1961. It was the first municipally-supported library for African-Americans in Knoxville, Tennessee and one of twelve segregated public libraries opened in the South … Read MoreFree Colored Library, Knoxville, Tennessee (1918-1961)

Negro Public Library, Nashville, Tennessee (1916-1949)

The Negro Public Library (later the Negro Branch of the Nashville Public Library) operated for over thirty years as a segregated library facility in Nashville, Tennessee. It was the city’s first public library for African Americans and one of only a dozen segregated public libraries … Read MoreNegro Public Library, Nashville, Tennessee (1916-1949)

The Clinton Desegregation Crisis (1956)

The Clinton Desegregation Crisis of 1956 occurred at Clinton High School in Clinton Tennessee. The crisis was the result of the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court which called for the desegregation of public schools across the nation. In … Read MoreThe Clinton Desegregation Crisis (1956)