Virginia University of Lynchburg (1886- )

Virginia University of Lynchburg was established in 1886 during the 19th session of the Virginia State Baptist Church Convention, held at the First Baptist Church in Lexington, Virginia. As one of the oldest institutions of higher education for black Virginians, it was founded on the … Read MoreVirginia University of Lynchburg (1886- )

The Enforcement Act of 1870 (1870-1871)

In the five years following the Civil War, the U.S. Congress passed and the states ratified the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution. These amendments permanently ended slavery and granted African Americans access to civil rights and suffrage as citizens of the United … Read MoreThe Enforcement Act of 1870 (1870-1871)

Clara Belle Drisdale Williams (1885-1994)

Clara Belle Drisdale, the first African American to graduate from New Mexico State University, was born to sharecroppers Isaac and Carrie Melinda Moppins Drisdale in LaGrange, Texas on October 29, 1885. She was first educated in a one room country school house near LaGrange but … Read MoreClara Belle Drisdale Williams (1885-1994)

Charles Henry Turner (1867-1923)

A prolific scholar and passionate educator, Dr. Charles Henry Turner made significant contributions to the fields of zoology, entomology, and psychology. Over a thirty-year career, he published widely on not only scientific topics, but also civil rights and education, authoring over seventy articles in total. … Read MoreCharles Henry Turner (1867-1923)

Mary Virginia Wood (Forten) (1815-1840)

Mary Virginia Wood is best known as the mother of poet, diarist, and abolitionist Charlotte Forten, but she was also an abolitionist in her own right. Born enslaved in Hertford, Perquimans County, North Carolina, Mary was the eldest of the four daughters of wealthy planter … Read MoreMary Virginia Wood (Forten) (1815-1840)