Gloria Conyers Hewitt (1935- )

Born October 26, 1935 in Sumter, South Carolina, Gloria Conyers Hewitt grew up persistent. Her father, Emmett C. Conyers, and her mother, Crenella Conyers, thought that their children should attend college as they believed that was the only opportunity for improvement for African Americans. While … Read MoreGloria Conyers Hewitt (1935- )

Edwin Clarence Joseph Turpin Howard (1846-1912)

Edwin Clarence Joseph Turpin Howard was the first African-American graduate of Harvard Medical College and also one of the founding members of the oldest African-American Greek-lettered organization, Sigma Pi Phi. Howard was born on October 21, 1846 in Boston, Massachusetts to Joan Louise Turpin Howard … Read MoreEdwin Clarence Joseph Turpin Howard (1846-1912)

Trans-Atlantic Food Migration: The African Culinary Influence on the Cuisine of the Americas

In the article below, culinary historian Diane M. Spivey describes the centuries-old diaspora of African foods and cooking traditions in North and South America. Africa has been a major contributor to the cuisine of North and South America although this contribution has long been overlooked, … Read MoreTrans-Atlantic Food Migration: The African Culinary Influence on the Cuisine of the Americas

Lynching of Julia and Frazier Baker (1898)

Frazier Baker, a schoolteacher and married father of six, was appointed the first African American postmaster of Lake City, South Carolina, in July 1897 by President William McKinley. Baker and his wife Lavinia were born in Effingham, South Carolina, a mostly black area, where he had previously served … Read MoreLynching of Julia and Frazier Baker (1898)

Jesse O. Thomas (1885-1972)

Jesse O. Thomas, early 20th century civil rights leader and protégé of Booker T. Washington, established the Atlanta, Georgia chapter of the National Urban League, a civil rights organization based in New York City, New York in 1919. Thomas was born in McComb, Mississippi to Amanda Johnson and Jefferson Thomas on December 21, 1885. Until the … Read MoreJesse O. Thomas (1885-1972)

Stono Rebellion (1739)

On Sunday, September 9th, 1739 the British colony of South Carolina was shaken by a slave uprising that culminated with the death of sixty people. Led by an Angolan named Jemmy, a band of twenty slaves organized a rebellion on the banks of the Stono River. After breaking into Hutchinson’s store the band, … Read MoreStono Rebellion (1739)

The First South Carolina Volunteer Infantry Regiment (1862-1866)

The First South Carolina Volunteer Infantry was the first officially recognized black unit of the Union Army during the Civil War. It was quietly authorized by President Abraham Lincoln and organized in August of 1862. The regiment reached its full complement of 1,000 men and was mustered in during … Read MoreThe First South Carolina Volunteer Infantry Regiment (1862-1866)