African Americans and the Knights of Labor (1869-1949)

Founded in Philadelphia in 1869, the Knights of Labor (KOL) was the largest, most important labor union in the 19th century United States. Unlike most unions (and predominantly white institutions) then, the KOL opened its membership to African Americans and women workers. Prior to the … Read MoreAfrican Americans and the Knights of Labor (1869-1949)

Soul Train (1970-2006)

Soul Train, one of the longest-running syndicated shows in television history, began in 1970 on the Chicago television station WCIU-TV when there were few outlets for popular Black culture throughout the United States. It was a radical move for the time, exhibiting the cultural perspectives … Read MoreSoul Train (1970-2006)

Jermaine LaJuane Jackson (1954 – )

Bass guitarist, vocalist Jermaine LaJuane Jackson was born on December 11, 1954, in Gary, Indiana, to Joseph Walter Jackson, a steelworker and manager of the family’s band from Fountain Hill, Arkansas, and Kattie B. Screws Jackson, a homemaker from Clayton, Alabama. He is the fourth … Read MoreJermaine LaJuane Jackson (1954 – )

Jr. Walker & The All-Stars (1964-1979)

The 20th-century evolution of Jr. Walker & The All-Stars began with “The Rhythm Rockers,” which became “The All-Stars” in 1961. In 1964, Walker & The All-Stars signed with Motown Records. The ensemble’s legendary composer and leader was Autry “Jr. Walker” DeWalt Mixon II, was born … Read MoreJr. Walker & The All-Stars (1964-1979)