Dorothy Irene Height (1912-2010)

Born on March 24, 1912, Dorothy Irene Height would become an activist, administrator, and educator dedicated to seeing racial and women’s equality in the United States. Born in Richmond, Virginia, to parents James Height, a building contractor, and Fannie (Burroughs) Height, a nurse, she moved … Read MoreDorothy Irene Height (1912-2010)

Mary Jane McLeod Bethune (1875-1955)

Mary McLeod Bethune was a prominent educator, political leader, and social visionary whose early twentieth century activism for black women and civil rights laid the foundation for the modern civil rights era. Inspired by leaders such as Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Josephine St. Pierre-Ruffin, Bethune … Read MoreMary Jane McLeod Bethune (1875-1955)

Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954)

Voices of Black Suffragists Mary Church Terrell, a writer, suffragist, educator, and activist, co-founded the National Association of Colored Women and served as the organization’s first president. Known as “Mollie” to her family, Church who was born in Memphis, Tennessee in 1863, lived a life … Read MoreMary Church Terrell (1863-1954)

Elizabeth Ross Haynes (1883-1953)

In the early twentieth century Progressive era reformers largely ignored the needs of African American women.  Lacking settlement houses and other resources African American reformers such as Elizabeth Ross Haynes turned to one of the few institutions available to them, the YWCA.  Ross Haynes was … Read MoreElizabeth Ross Haynes (1883-1953)

Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin (1842-1924)

Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin was born into one of Boston’s leading families on August 31, 1842.  St. Pierre’s mother was an English-born white woman and her father was from the island of Martinique, and founder of the Boston Zion Church.  The St. Pierre’s sent their … Read MoreJosephine St. Pierre Ruffin (1842-1924)