Wilberforce University (1856- )

Wilberforce University was established near Xenia, Ohio in 1856 as a joint venture between the Methodist Episcopal Church and the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Named after 18th century abolitionist William Wilberforce, it was the first private, historically black university in the United States. It was … Read MoreWilberforce University (1856- )

Tuskegee University (1881- )

Tuskegee University, one of the largest historically black universities in the United States, is a private university located in Tuskegee, Alabama. It was founded by Lewis Adams, a former slave, and George W. Campbell, a former slave owner. Despite having no formal education, Adams could … Read MoreTuskegee University (1881- )

Cheikh Anta Diop University (1957–)

Cheikh Anta Diop University or Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD), located in Dakar, Senegal, is among the largest universities in French-speaking West Africa. The UCAD has a relatively long history as it has evolved from the Ecole de Médecine de Dakar, a Medical School that … Read MoreCheikh Anta Diop University (1957–)

Wiley College (1873- )

Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, is the first African-American college established in the Lone Star State.  The institution was founded in 1873 by Bishop Isaac Wiley of Methodist Episcopal Church and chartered by the Freedman’s Aid Society in 1882. Isaac Wiley grew up with dreams of becoming a … Read MoreWiley College (1873- )

Creek Seminole College (1906-ca. 1925)

The Creek Seminole College was officially opened in 1906 in Boley, a black town in Creek Nation, Indian Territory (today Oklahoma).  The school’s founder and president was John C. Leftwich, a graduate of Selma University in Alabama.  Leftwich built the college on five acres of … Read MoreCreek Seminole College (1906-ca. 1925)