African Americans and the Manhattan Project, Richland, WA (1942-1945)

Black Workers at Hanford, 1944 Image Ownership: Public domain Between the years of 1942 and 1944 around fifteen thousand blacks and fifty thousand whites were recruited to the Manhattan/ Hanford Project in Richland, Washington. The federal government required government contractor, DuPont, to keep the number … Read MoreAfrican Americans and the Manhattan Project, Richland, WA (1942-1945)

C. Steven McGann (1951 – )

C. Steven McGann joined the Foreign Service in 1992 and has since attained the status of Career member, Senior Foreign Service, with the rank of Minister-Counselor (FE-MC).  His overseas posts have included Taiwan, Zaire, South Africa, Australia, and Kenya. A member of the United States … Read MoreC. Steven McGann (1951 – )

The Three-Fifths Clause of the United States Constitution (1787)

The Practical Impact of the Three Fifths Clause to the U.S. Constitution "Image Ownership: Public Domain" Often misinterpreted to mean that African Americans as individuals are considered three-fifths of a person or that they are three-fifths of a citizen of the U.S., the three-fifths clause … Read MoreThe Three-Fifths Clause of the United States Constitution (1787)

Lucile Bluford (1911-2003)

Lucile Bluford was a pioneering black journalist who sought to integrate the University of Missouri in 1939, shortly after the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s (NAACP) test case centering on Lloyd Gaines, Gaines v. Canada, stalled when Gaines mysteriously disappeared.  Although Bluford … Read MoreLucile Bluford (1911-2003)