(1971) Sese Seko Mobutu, “Address to the Conseil Nationale Extraordinaire, Dakar, 14 February 1971”

President and Mrs. Sese Seko Mobutu Meeting Emperor Hirohito in Tokoyo, Japan, 1971 Image Ownership: Public Domain Sese Seko Ngbendu Waza Banga Mobutu, originally known as Joseph Desire Mobutu, served as Patrice Lumumba’s private secretary before being appointed Chief of Staff and second in command … Read More(1971) Sese Seko Mobutu, “Address to the Conseil Nationale Extraordinaire, Dakar, 14 February 1971”

(1972) M. Gatsha Buthelezi, “My Role Within Separate Development Politics”

Image Ownership: Public Domain In a speech before the Scandinavian Institute for African Affairs, Uppsala, Sweden, in December, 1972, Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi, then the Chief Executive Officer of the KwaZulu Territorial Authority, describes his cooperation with South African leaders despite his opposition to the country’s … Read More(1972) M. Gatsha Buthelezi, “My Role Within Separate Development Politics”

(1973) Desmond Tutu, “God-given Dignity and the Quest for Liberation”

Image Courtesy of Michael Collopy By the early 1970s South African cleric Desmond Mpilo Tutu had not yet achieved worldwide fame as an opponent of Apartheid.  Nonetheless, in a July 1973 paper delivered to the National Conference of the South African Council of Churches, Tutu … Read More(1973) Desmond Tutu, “God-given Dignity and the Quest for Liberation”

(1973) H.W. E. Ntsanwisi, “Petty Apartheid”

On August 18, 1973, Hudson William Edison Ntsanwisi, then Chief Minister of the “independent homeland” of Gazankulu in South Africa, was scheduled to present an address titled “Petty Apartheid” before the Sociological Symposium at the University of Pretoria.  Although the presentation was not made, his … Read More(1973) H.W. E. Ntsanwisi, “Petty Apartheid”

(1973) K.M.N. Guzana, “On Being a South African”

In 1973 attorney K.M.N. Guzana was leader of the opposition Democratic Party in the national legislature of the theoretically independent nation of Transkei, one of the former homelands created by South Africa to contain the black population and thus reduce their “majority” status in the … Read More(1973) K.M.N. Guzana, “On Being a South African”

(1973) Lucy Mvubelo, “My Plea to the International Labor Organization”

By the 1970s Lucy Mvubelo had become a powerful force in the black South African Labor Union Movement. Born in Johannesburg in 1920 she first joined the Garment Workers Union in 1946 and eventually became the first black woman on the National Executive Council of … Read More(1973) Lucy Mvubelo, “My Plea to the International Labor Organization”

(1974) M. Gatsha Buthelezi, “Towards Black Fulfillment”

Image Ownership: Public Domain Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi emerged in the 1970s as one of the moderate black leaders in South Africa’s anti-apartheid campaign.  In 1970 he was appointed leader of the KwaZulu Territorial Authority and in 1975 he created the Inkatha Freedom Party which drew … Read More(1974) M. Gatsha Buthelezi, “Towards Black Fulfillment”

(1980) Samora Machel, “Transform the State Apparatus into an Instrument of Victory”

Samora Machel, the leader of the Mozambique Liberation Front and first president of independent Mozambique (1975-1986), was a Marxist-Leninist.  In the speech below, given in Maputo, the capital, on February 7, 1980, he describes the use of the state bureaucracy in fashioning his version of … Read More(1980) Samora Machel, “Transform the State Apparatus into an Instrument of Victory”

(1983) Samora Machel “Every Revolution is a Contribution to Marxism”

In the following address given in Berlin, East Germany on April 11, 1983 at celebrations marking the centennial of the death of Karl Marx, Samora Machel, discusses the relevance of Marxist struggle to the Third World and especially to his nation, Mozambique. Dear comrades, with … Read More(1983) Samora Machel “Every Revolution is a Contribution to Marxism”

(1990) Nelson Mandela, “We Have Waited Too Long For Our Freedom”

In 1990 the South African government released Nelson Mandela from Victor Verster Prison in Paarl, South Africa after more than 28 years of incarceration including more than 20 years in South Africa’s most notorious prison, Robben Island.  Here is the speech he gave in Cape … Read More(1990) Nelson Mandela, “We Have Waited Too Long For Our Freedom”