Daren Salter

Independent Historian

Daren Salter is a PhD candidate in American history at the University of Washington. He received a Master’s Degree in American History from San Francisco State University, where he was named the History Department’s Distinguished Graduate Student for 2004. A student of race, labor, and radicalism, Salter’s essay, “Legacy of Paradox:  The Communist Party, Civil Rights, and the Politics of Race in the Pacific Northwest, 1928-1945,” was awarded the History Department’s York-Mason Prize for outstanding graduate essay on African Americans in the West in 2006. He is a past Fellow at the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies and was a project coordinator and Associate Editor for the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project from 2005-2009. He currently teaches Humanities at the Northwest School in Seattle.

Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture) (1941-1998)

A civil rights leader, antiwar activist, and Pan-African revolutionary, Stokely Carmichael is best known for popularizing the slogan “Black Power,” which in the mid 1960s galvanized a movement toward more militant and separatist assertions of black identity, nationalism, and empowerment and away from the liberal, … Read MoreStokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture) (1941-1998)

Hubert Brown (H. Rap) /Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin (1943- )

H. Rap Brown succeeded Stokely Carmichael as chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and was a prominent figure in the Black Panther Party. A leading proponent of Black Power and a polarizing media icon, Brown symbolized both the power and the dangers—for white Americans and for radical activists themselves—of the civil rights movement’s new … Read MoreHubert Brown (H. Rap) /Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin (1943- )

James W. Ford (1893-1957)

Communist Party Presidential Campaign Poster, 1932 with image of James Ford as the Vice Presidential Candidate. Image Ownership: Public domain James W. Ford was Special Organizer of the CommunistParty’s Harlem, New York section and the most prominent black Communist in the nation during the 1930s and early 1940s. … Read MoreJames W. Ford (1893-1957)

Robert F. Williams (1925-1996)

Image Courtesy of California Newsreel Robert F. Williams was a militant civil rights leader whose open advocacy of armed self-defense anticipated the movement for "black power" in the late 1960s and helped inspire groups like the Student National Coordinating Committee, the Revolutionary Action Movement, and … Read MoreRobert F. Williams (1925-1996)

African Blood Brotherhood (1919-1924)

"Image Ownership: Public Domian" The African Blood Brotherhood for African Liberation and Redemption (ABB) was a militant black liberation group founded in 1919 by West Indian journalist Cyril Briggs. The ABB advocated armed defense against racist assaults and the creation of an independent black socialist … Read MoreAfrican Blood Brotherhood (1919-1924)

Max Yergan (1892–1975)

Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Behring Center, Smithsonian Institution In a remarkable and controversial life, Max Yergan spanned both the globe and the ideological spectrum of American politics. An early champion of racial uplift and the social gospel in South … Read MoreMax Yergan (1892–1975)

Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (1925–1978)

Mass Meeting, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, Chicago, 1933 Image Courtesy of the Chicago History Museum, ICHi-25673. The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (BSCP) was a labor union organized by African American employees of the Pullman Company in August 1925 and led by A. Philip … Read MoreBrotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (1925–1978)

Civil Rights Congress (1946-1956)

Paul Robeson & Civil Rights Congress Picketing the White House, August, 1948 Image Ownership: Public Domain Founded in Detroit, Michigan in 1946, the Civil Rights Congress (CRC) arose out of the merger of three groups with ties to the Communist Party USA:  the International Labor … Read MoreCivil Rights Congress (1946-1956)

Angelo Herndon (1913 – ?)

Image Ownership: Public Domain Angelo Herndon was the defendant in one of the most publicized and notorious legal cases of the 1930s. In 1932, nineteen-year-old Herndon was arrested under an obscure 19th century servile insurrection law for attempting to organize a peaceful demonstration of unemployed … Read MoreAngelo Herndon (1913 – ?)