25th Infantry Regiment (1866-1947)

When the U.S. Army was reorganized on July 28, 1866 for peacetime service after the American Civil War, six regiments were set aside for black enlisted men.  These included four infantry regiments, numbered 38th through 41st.  The 25th Infantry was created during a reduction in March 1869 by … Read More25th Infantry Regiment (1866-1947)

African Americans and the Manhattan Project, Richland, WA (1942-1945)

Black Workers at Hanford, 1944 Image Ownership: Public domain Between the years of 1942 and 1944 around fifteen thousand blacks and fifty thousand whites were recruited to the Manhattan/ Hanford Project in Richland, Washington. The federal government required government contractor, DuPont, to keep the number … Read MoreAfrican Americans and the Manhattan Project, Richland, WA (1942-1945)

East Pasco Co-op (1965- )

Art Fletcher, Founder of the East Pasco Co-op Image Ownership: Public domain The East Pasco African American community emerged quickly during World War II when thousands of black workers were recruited to help construct the Hanford Atomic Energy Complex just north of neighboring Richland, Washington. … Read MoreEast Pasco Co-op (1965- )

Seattle Steelheads (1946)

Poster for Seattle Steelheads at Borchert Field, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, August 12, 1946 "Image Ownership: Public Domain" The Seattle Steelheads were the all-black minor league baseball team formed in the spring of 1946 as part of the West Coast Negro Baseball League organized by Abe Saperstein … Read MoreSeattle Steelheads (1946)

Seattle Royal Giants (1928-1945)

Seattle Royal Giants, ca. 1933 "Image Ownership: Public Domain" The Seattle Royal Giants was a semi-professional baseball team that played through the Pacific Northwest in the first half of the 20th Century.  The Giants began in 1928 under the leadership of three former professional players … Read MoreSeattle Royal Giants (1928-1945)

African Cowboys on the Argentine Pampas: Their Disappearance from the Historical Record

Following the introduction of cattle into the Caribbean in 1493, during Christopher Columbus’s second voyage, cattle ranching proliferated along a series of frontiers across the grasslands of North and South America. While historians have recognized that Africans and their descendants were involved in the establishment … Read MoreAfrican Cowboys on the Argentine Pampas: Their Disappearance from the Historical Record

Northwest Black Pioneers (1987- )

During the late 1980s the Northwest Black Pioneers (NWBP) was conceived by participants of the Roots Festival, an annual African American cultural gathering in Seattle.  In the summer of 1987, a steering committee formed in that same city to discuss strategies to encourage The Bon … Read MoreNorthwest Black Pioneers (1987- )

Kansas Emancipation League (1862)

Image Ownership: Public Domain The Kansas Emancipation League’s primary goal was “to bring about emancipation throughout the whole land.” It was initiated at the First Baptist Church in Leavenworth, Kansas in 1862. It also pledged to “support the war until its successful termination,” put an … Read MoreKansas Emancipation League (1862)

Prince Hall Masons (1784- )

Dedication of the Prince Hall Masons Monument at Cambridge Massachusetts, September 13, 2008 Image Ownership: Public Domain The Prince Hall Masons are the oldest and largest group of Masons of African origin in the world.  Today there are forty Grand Lodges of Prince Hall Freemasonry … Read MorePrince Hall Masons (1784- )

St. Martin De Porres Club (1947- )

The De Porres Club, 1951 Image Courtesy of Creighton University Library The St. Martin De Porres Club was founded in 1947 by Father John P. Markoe, S.J., a  priest, and Creighton University students interested in local civil rights issues in Omaha, Nebraska.   Father Markoe was … Read MoreSt. Martin De Porres Club (1947- )