25th Infantry Regiment (1866-1947)

When the U.S. Army was reorganized on July 28, 1866 for peacetime service after the American Civil War, six regiments were set aside for black enlisted men.  These included four infantry regiments, numbered 38th through 41st.  The 25th Infantry was created during a reduction in March 1869 by … Read More25th Infantry Regiment (1866-1947)

Carl Brewer (1957– )

Carl Brewer served as the 100th Mayor of Wichita, Kansas, only the second African American elected to that office. Brewer was born on March 8, 1957 in Wichita, Kansas. He attended Wichita North High school, and graduated in 1975. He obtained his first job at … Read MoreCarl Brewer (1957– )

Kevin Maurice Johnson (1966- )

Kevin Maurice Johnson served as Mayor of Sacramento, California, from December 2, 2008 to December 13, 2016. Johnson, the son of Georgia West and Lawrence Johnson, was born in California’s capital city on March 4, 1966. He graduated from Sacramento High School, where he led … Read MoreKevin Maurice Johnson (1966- )

Alma S. Jacobs (1916-1997)

Librarian Alma Smith Jacobs was the first African American to serve as the Montana State Librarian. She was a lifelong advocate of free access to library resources and was active in local and state civil rights causes. Alma Victoria Smith Jacobs was born in Lewistown, Montana on November 21, 1916. … Read MoreAlma S. Jacobs (1916-1997)

Danny Scarborough (1947-1989)

Danny Lyon Scarborough made his mark in the world in two arenas, as an innovative, Emmy Award-winning choreographer/dancer, and as one of the first well-known African Americans to go public about having AIDS.  Born on July 27, 1947, he grew up on a farm near Wake … Read MoreDanny Scarborough (1947-1989)

Cliff Hooper, Sr. (1917-2001)

Cliff Hooper, Sr. was an artist, an activist, and a community leader. Though born in Evansville, Indiana, he became an important part of the black community in Seattle.  Hooper graduated from the Cornish School of Allied Arts in Seattle in 1953 and soon earned recognition … Read MoreCliff Hooper, Sr. (1917-2001)

William A. Hilliard (1927-2017)

William A. “Bill” Hilliard was the first black editor of the Portland Oregonian, the largest daily newspaper in Oregon, and the first black president of the American Society of Newspaper Editors. Hilliard, one of four children, was born May 28, 1927 in Chicago, Illinois, to Ruth and Felix Hilliard.  His … Read MoreWilliam A. Hilliard (1927-2017)

Green I. Currin (1842–1918)

Born in 1842, in Williamson County, Tennessee, Green I. Currin (sometimes referred to as G.I. or Jacob Curran) was the first African American to serve in the Oklahoma Territorial Legislature, winning election to its inaugural session in 1890. During the territorial period, Currin also served as a U.S. deputy marshal … Read MoreGreen I. Currin (1842–1918)

Allen Brooks (1853?-1910)

On Thursday, March 3, 1910, a Dallas, Texas mob lynched Allen Brooks, a fifty-seven-year-old African American man.  His murder was one of a number of lynchings in major Texas cities. Little is known about Brooks’s early life.  He was born in either Maryland or Texas around 1853.  By the beginning of the … Read MoreAllen Brooks (1853?-1910)

Charles H. Dodge (1868-1942)

Image Ownership: Public domain At a time in when educated, skilled, and ambitious African Americans were systematically excluded from even middle management positions in large white-controlled businesses, for decades Charles H. Dodge remained one of the extremely rare persons in the nation to occupy a … Read MoreCharles H. Dodge (1868-1942)