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Washington, Matthew G.

Matthew Washington.JPG

Matthew G. Washington is currently a first year Ph.D. student in history at Morgan State University (Baltimore, Maryland). He graduated from West Chester University (West Chester, Pennsylvania) in 2014 with a Master of Arts in history. Washington attended Kutztown University (Kutztown, Pennsylvania) and graduated in 2011 with a Bachelor of Arts in sociology with a history minor. Washington is a member of the Nu-Sigma Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta. He also serves as Vice President of the History, African American and Museum Studies Graduate Council (HAFRAM GC) at Morgan State.

In April of 2014, Washington presented an essay entitled, “Nat Turner’s Rebellion and the Role that Terrorism played in It,” at the Phi Alpha Theta Regional Conference in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania. During the summer of 2012, he conducted several oral history interviews with Horace A. Davenport, the first black judge in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.

Washington’s current research focuses on northern manifestations of Jim Crow segregation during the 1950s. He has been conducting archival research in Southeastern, Pennsylvania.




AFFILIATION:
Morgan State University
EMAIL:
mawas10@morgan.edu
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