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Jack, Bryan

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Dr. Bryan M. Jack received his Ph.D. in American Studies from Saint Louis University, his M.A. in American Studies from the University of Alabama, and his B.A. in History from Baker University.  As Assistant Professor of History and Coordinator of the History Program at Winston-Salem State University, his areas of teaching and research include African American history, United States history, the confluence of history and popular culture, and race in the Midwest.  A Kansas native, Jack’s manuscript The St. Louis African American Community and the Exodusters (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2007), is drawn from his dissertation and examines the role that the city of St. Louis played in the Exoduster migration to Kansas in 1879.  He has presented at numerous conferences, has contributed to the Notorious Lives encyclopedia, and has been interviewed about the Exodusters for a National Parks Service Film.  He is married to Jenny Deyto, a physician’s assistant, and most summer evenings will find them watching their beloved St. Louis Cardinals.
AFFILIATION:
Winston-Salem State University
EMAIL:
jackb@wssu.edu
WEBSITE:
http://www.blackpast.org/n/a
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BlackPast.org is an independent non-profit corporation 501(c)(3). It has no affiliation with the University of Washington. BlackPast.org is supported in part by a grant from Humanities Washington, a state-wide non-profit organization supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the state of Washington, and contributions from individuals and foundations.