BlackPast.org Facebook BlackPast.org Twitter

Donate to BlackPast.org BlackPast Blog
  • African American History
  • African American History in the West
  • Global African History
  • Perspectives

NOTE: BlackPast.org will not disclose, use, give or sell any of the requested information to third parties.

11 + 0 =
Solve this simple math problem and enter the result. E.g. for 1+3, enter 4.

Shop Amazon and help BlackPast.org

Blackpast.org in the Classroom

Anderson, John

John Anderson.jpg
John Anderson has a degree in history and political science from Northern Arizona University.   He has spoken before the New Jersey Historical Society Highlands Iron Ore Conference on the maritime history of the North Jersey Highlands as well as other topics.  He has presented maritime history topics before a wide range of community audiences. He has authored a diverse range of articles anchored in maritime affairs and history.  Anderson is currently working on research to determine the maritime aspects of the North Branch of the Rancocas Creek and possible connections to the Delaware River and other Mid-Atlantic inland rivers and waters.  His specific interest is focused on determining how the region’s maritime history folds into New Jersey’s Burlington County, Westhampton Township’s Timbuctoo Village landing and adjacent Farmstead sites that date back to 1756.  Material collected and documented is to be used in support of establishing a New Jersey State canoe trail that incorporates historical sites along the lower reaches of the Rancocas Creek.
AFFILIATION:
Independent Historian
EMAIL:
ingvarja@verizon.net
WEBSITE:
BlackPast.Org Contributions:
Copyright 2007-2017 - BlackPast.org v2.0 | blackpast@blackpast.org | Your donations help us to grow. | We welcome your suggestions. | Mission Statement

BlackPast.org is an independent non-profit corporation 501(c)(3). It has no affiliation with the University of Washington. BlackPast.org is supported in part by a grant from Humanities Washington, a state-wide non-profit organization supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the state of Washington, and contributions from individuals and foundations.